Aviator News

It Runs in the Family

Valeria+Gomez.+Photo+taken+by+Pedro+Adame.
Valeria Gomez. Photo taken by Pedro Adame.

Valeria Gomez. Photo taken by Pedro Adame.

Valeria Gomez. Photo taken by Pedro Adame.

Valeria Gomez, Book Reviews Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






I want to start off by saying that I actually don’t like shopping; I find it quite boring and don’t waste time searching for an outfit. Ironically, I always love reading the “Shopaholic” series by Sophie Kinsella. I own and have read almost every book written by Kinsella, enjoying the light comedy and cheesy romances her novels provide. This is why it disappoints me to say that I was not a big fan of the novel Mini Shopaholic.

Becky Brandon (neé Bloomwood) has an addiction; she is obsessed with shopping. Though she tries to break the habit, she finds little success. Unfortunately, she now feels a certain entitlement to shopping because she has recently become mother to her daughter Minnie. To Becky’s dismay, shopping with Minnie is not everything she hoped it would be. Minnie is unpredictable and will often create a scene wherever they go. Minnie will kick, scream, and do everything possible to get what she wants. The situation is so bad, they have already been kicked out of multiple stores. The Brandons are also experiencing some financial troubles: Luke’s business is not doing well, they are living with Becky’s parents, and (worst of all) there is not enough money for shopping. What is Becky’s solution? Throw a party for her husband Luke to “relieve” all of this stress.

Becky is infuriating throughout the novel. Though it was meant to be comedic, I often found the novel irritating and repetitive. I find it strange that Becky continues with her old ways after having so many troublesome experiences with her addiction. I was also appalled that she would spoil her daughter so much, showing her how to carry on this unhealthy habit. Becky gave Minnie an allowance thinking it would teach her daughter the value of money. However, this valuable lesson fell through because Becky herself does not know how to handle money. Becky left Minnie in debt, letting Minnie forward her allowance for more than the next few years of her life. Luke is the only sensible one in the novel; he understands Minnie’s behavior is not acceptable and tries to hire a nanny to help solve the problem. Becky ruins this by feigning that Minnie is an angel when she knows this will not help. Mini Shopaholic showed that Becky is unable to change, carrying on deceptions and her shopaholic ways. I wished Kinsella would’ve allowed Becky to go through some character development by now, especially as a mother. I would find it more interesting to see how Becky developed healthier habits or at least tried to in an effort to be a role model to Minnie. However, I was sorely disappointed. I would not recommend Mini Shopaholic. There are other books by Kinsella that I enjoyed more and would prefer to read again. Mini Shopaholic was simply not on my list of top books.  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    There’s A New Sherlock In Town

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    Love Never Dies

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    It Finally Starts

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    An Unexpected Romance

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    The Documented Story of Her Undocumented Family

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    Psychotic Romance

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    #Relatable

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    A Sorcerer’s Communion

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    Imperfection is Perfection

  • It Runs in the Family

    Book Reviews

    Missing Diamonds

The student news site of Hawthorne Math and Science Academy
It Runs in the Family